Power & Cooling Systems

Air conditioning, or cooling Systems, are more complicated than heating. Instead of using energy to create heat, air conditioners use energy to take heat away. The most common air conditioning system uses a compressor cycle (similar to the one used by your refrigerator) to transfer heat from your house to the outdoors.

Picture your house like a refrigerator.

There is a compressor on the outside filled with a special fluid called a refrigerant. This fluid can change back and forth between liquid and gas. As it changes, it absorbs or releases heat, so it is used to “carry” heat from one place to another, such as from the inside of the refrigerator to the outside. Simple, right?

Well, no. And the process gets quite a bit more complicated with all the controls and valves involved. But its effect is remarkable. An air conditioner takes heat from a cooler place and dumps it in a warmer place, seemingly working against the laws of physics. What drives the process, of course, is electricity — quite a lot of it, in fact.

Types of Cooling Systems

Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps

Central air conditioners and heat pumps are designed to cool the entire house. In each system, a large compressor unit located outside drives the process; an indoor coil filled with refrigerant cools air that is then distributed throughout the house. Heat pumps are like central air conditioners, except that the cycle can be reversed and used for heating during the winter months. (Heat pumps are described in more detail in the heating section.) With a central air conditioner, the same duct system is used with a furnace for forced warm-air heating. In fact, the central air conditioner typically uses the furnace fan to distribute air to the ducts.

Central air conditioners and air-source heat pumps operating in the cooling mode have been rated according to their seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) since 1992. SEER is the seasonal cooling output in Btu divided by the seasonal energy input in watt-hours for an “average” U.S. climate. Before 1992, different metrics were used, but the performance of many older central air conditioners was equivalent to SEER ratings of only 6 or 7. The average central air conditioner sold in 1988 had a SEER-equivalent of about 9; by 2002 it had risen to 11.1.

Room Air Conditioners

Room air conditioners are available for mounting in windows or through walls, but in each caseviaducts, they work the same way, with the compressor located outside. Room air conditioners are sized to cool just one room, so a number of them may be required for a whole house. Individual units cost less to buy than central systems.

Evaporative Coolers

Evaporative coolers, sometimes called swamp coolers, are less common than vapor compression (refrigerant) air conditioners, but they are a practical alternative in very dry areas, such as the Southwest. They work by pulling fresh outside air through moist pads where the air is cooled by evaporation. The cooler air is then circulated through a house. This process is very similar to the experience of feeling cold when you get out of a swimming pool in the breeze. An evaporative cooler can lower the temperature of outside air by as much as 30 degrees.

They can save as much as 75% on cooling costs during the summer because the only mechanical component that uses electricity is the fan. Plus, because the technology is simpler, it can also cost much less to purchase than a central air conditioner — often about half.

Ductless Mini-Split Air Conditioners

Mini-split systems, very popular in other countries, can be an attractive retrofit option for room additions and for houses without ductwork, such as those using hydronic heat (see the heating section). Like conventional central air conditioners, mini-splits use an outside compressor/condenser and indoor air handling units. The difference is that each room or zone to be cooled has its own air handler. Each indoor unit is connected to the outdoor unit via a conduit carrying the power and refrigerant lines. Indoor units are typically mounted on the wall or ceiling.

 Call us today at (772)202-3145

 

Comments are closed.